Cracker Barrel Old Country Store, Inc.
CBRL GROUP INC (Form: 8-K, Received: 10/03/2007 09:05:07)
 

 
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 8-K
CURRENT REPORT
PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
Date of Report (date of earliest event reported): October 2, 2007
CBRL GROUP, INC.
         
Tennessee   0-25225   62-1749513
         
(State or Other Jurisdiction   (Commission File Number)   (I.R.S. Employer
of Incorporation)       Identification No.)
305 Hartmann Drive, Lebanon, Tennessee 37087
(615) 444-5533
Check the appropriate box if the Form 8-K filing is intended to simultaneously satisfy the filing obligation of the registrant under any of the following provisions:
o Written communications pursuant to Rule 425 under the Securities Act (17 CFR 230.425)
o Soliciting material pursuant to Rule 14a-12 under the Exchange Act (17 CFR 240.14a-12)
o Pre-commencement communications pursuant to Rule 14d-2(b) under the Exchange Act (17 CFR 240.14d-2(b))
o Pre-commencement communications pursuant to Rule 13e-4(c) under the Exchange Act (17 CFR 240.13e-4(c))
 
 

 


 

Item 7.01. Regulation FD Disclosure.
     On October 2, 2007, CBRL Group, Inc. (the “Company”) issued the press release, which is furnished hereto as Exhibit 99.1 and incorporated by reference as if fully set forth herein, announcing the comparable store sales for its Cracker Barrel Old Country Store ® restaurants and gift shops for the four-week period ending Friday, September 28, 2007.
     On October 3, 2007, the Company will present the information that is furnished as Exhibits 99.2 through 99.11 to this Current Report on Form 8-K, which by this reference is incorporated herein as if copied verbatim, to current and potential investors.
Item 9.01. Financial Statements and Exhibits.
(d)   Exhibits.
     See Exhibit Index immediately following signature page.

 


 

SIGNATURE
     Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned hereunto duly authorized.
         
Dated: October 3, 2007  CBRL GROUP, INC.
 
 
  By:    /s/ N.B. Forrest Shoaf  
    Name:   N.B. Forrest Shoaf   
    Title:   Senior Vice President, Secretary
and General Counsel 
 
 

 


 

EXHIBIT INDEX
     
Exhibit No.   Description
 
   
99.1
  Press Release issued by CBRL Group, Inc. dated October 2, 2007
 
   
99.2
  Cracker Barrel Fact Book dated October 3, 2007
 
   
99.3
  Presentation of Diana Wynne
 
   
99.4
  Presentation of Mike Woodhouse
 
   
99.5
  Presentation of Doug Barber
 
   
99.6
  Presentation of Terry Maxwell
 
   
99.7
  Presentation of Deb Evans
 
   
99.8
  Presentation of Simon Turner
 
   
99.9
  Presentation of Ed Greene
 
   
99.10
  Presentation of Larry White
 
   
99.11
  Presentation of Bob Doyle

 


 

Exhibit 99.1
     
(CBRL GROUP, INC. LOGO)
  Post Office Box 787
Lebanon, Tennessee
37088-0787
 
C B R L  G r o u p,  I n c.
 
     
Investor Contact:
  Diana S. Wynne
 
  Senior Vice President, Corporate Affairs
 
  (615) 443-9837
 
   
Media Contact:
  Julie K. Davis
 
  Director, Corporate Communications
 
  (615) 443-9266
CBRL GROUP REPORTS SEPTEMBER COMPARABLE STORE SALES
LEBANON, Tenn. — October 2, 2007 — CBRL Group, Inc. (“CBRL” or the “Company”) (Nasdaq: CBRL) today reported comparable store sales for its Cracker Barrel Old Country Store ® restaurants and gift shops for the four-week period ending Friday, September 28, 2007. The sales are compared with comparable weeks, not the prior-year fiscal period, as a result of the 53 rd week in the fiscal year ended on August 3, 2007:
    Comparable store restaurant sales increased 1.5% from the comparable four-week period last year, with approximately 3.1% higher average check primarily due to an average menu price increase of about 3.8%. Traffic declined approximately 1.6%.
 
    Comparable store retail sales were down 0.2% from the comparable four-week period in fiscal 2007. Excluding the effect of Porch Sale clearance events in both years, sales would have increased 2.0%.
Headquartered in Lebanon, Tennessee, CBRL Group, Inc. presently operates 565 Cracker Barrel Old Country Store restaurants and gift shops located in 41 states.
- END -


 

Exhibit 99.2
Fact Book October 3, 2007


 

Safe-Harbor Statement The company uses caution in considering its current trends and the earnings disclosed in this Fact Book. The restaurant industry is highly competitive, and trends and guidance are subject to numerous factors and influences, some of which are discussed in the cautionary language other than its periodic filings on Forms 10-K, 10-Q, and 8-K (and any amendments to those forms) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC). Except for specific historical information, many of the matters discussed in this document may express or imply projections of revenues or expenditures, plans and objectives for future operations, growth or initiatives, expected future economic performance, or the expected outcome or impact of pending or threatened litigation. These and similar statements regarding events or results that CBRL Group, Inc. (the "Company") expects will or may occur in the future, are forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and other factors which may cause actual results and performance of the Company to differ materially from those expressed or implied by those statements. All forward-looking information is provided pursuant to the safe harbor established under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and should be evaluated in the context of these risks, uncertainties and other factors. Forward-looking statements generally can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology such as "trends," "assumptions," "target," "guidance," "outlook," "opportunity", "future," "plans," "goals," "objectives," "expectations," "near-term," "long-term," "projection," "may," "will," "would," "could," "expect," "intend," "estimate," "anticipate," "believe," "potential," "regular," or "continue" (or the negative or other derivatives of each of these terms) or similar terminology. The Company believes the assumptions underlying these forward-looking statements are reasonable; however, any of the assumptions could be inaccurate, and therefore, actual results may differ materially from those projected in or implied by the forward-looking statements. Factors and risks that may result in actual results differing from this forward- looking information include, but are not limited to, those listed in Part I, Item 1A of the 2007 Annual Report on Form 10-K, as well as other factors including, without limitation, the factors described under "Critical Accounting Estimates" in that portion of the 2007 Annual Report that is incorporated by reference into Part II, Item 7 or, from time to time, in the Company's filings with the SEC, press releases and other communications. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements made in this document, since the statements speak only as of the document's date. The Company has no obligation, and does not intend, to publicly update or revise any of these forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this document or to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events. Readers are advised, however, to consult any future public disclosures the Company may make on subjects related to those discussed in this document.


 

Financial Data Financial information and data reported herein may include audited data or data extracted from audited financial statements, but readers should not rely on such data as being audited unless so designated. For audited financial information or more detailed footnote disclosure, the reader is directed to the Company's periodic reports, which can be found at the SEC's website, sec.gov, or the Company's website at cbrlgroup.com. "Non-GAAP financial measures," as that term is defined by the SEC in regulation G, are included in this document. The reconciliations to GAAP measures are reflected in the Appendix at the end of this document and are also available on our web site, cbrlgroup.com. Certain numbers in this supplement are from the Company's audited financial statements, but readers should refer only to the audited financial statements themselves to rely on audited results.


 

Corporate Profile Corporate Profile The principal activity of CBRL Group, Inc. ("CBRL, "CBRL Group," "our," and "we") (Nasdaq: CBRL) is to operate and develop the Cracker Barrel Old Country Store(r) restaurant and retail concept ("Cracker Barrel"). CBRL Group operates more than 560 Cracker Barrel Old Country Store restaurants and gift shops located in 41 states. The restaurants serve breakfast, lunch and dinner. The retail area offers a variety of decorative and functional items specializing in rocking chairs, holiday gifts and toys, apparel and foods. The Cracker Barrel Brand Thirty-eight years ago, Cracker Barrel's founder, Dan Evins, recognized the potential to offer interstate highway travelers quality food, service and value consistently and conveniently by focusing on a mission of "Pleasing People." The initial success of the concept drove continued expansion along the interstate system, and today Cracker Barrel has evolved into an indelible part of the automotive travel experience. It is now one of the leading and most highly differentiated restaurant chains in the United States. Cracker Barrel welcomes about 600,000 people per day on average, serving meals for three day-parts and offering breakfast all day through its more than 560 stores. Each location also has one of our unique retail shops that generated in fiscal 2007 an average of more than $917,000 in retail sales on a 53 week basis, or over $429 per square foot of retail selling space, driven primarily by the high level of restaurant guest traffic. Cracker Barrel is a recognized guest favorite, having been named "Best in Family Dining" by Restaurants and Institutions magazine's "Choice in Chains" consumer survey for the 17th consecutive year. For the 14th year in a row, Destinations magazine's annual survey of bus operators and tour planners named Cracker Barrel the Best Restaurant Chain for Groups. The Good Sam Club named Cracker Barrel "the Most RV Friendly Sit- Down Restaurant in America" for the 6th year in a row. In addition, CBRL Group was named the third most admired food service company on Fortune's Most Admired Company list in 2007-the only full service restaurant on the list. In the 2007 Competitive Advantage Report: Restaurant & Beverage prepared by Kanbay Research Institute, Cracker Barrel was named the #1 restaurant in the casual dining category in meeting customer expectations


 

Awards Most RV-Friendly Sit-Down Restaurant in America - 6 yrs The Good Sam Club Best Restaurant Chain for Groups - 14 yrs Destinations magazine's annual survey of bus operators and tour planners Fortune's 3rd Most Admired Food Service Company in 2007 First Among Full Service Restaurants #1 Restaurant in the Casual Dining Category in Meeting Customer Expectations 2007 Competitive Advantage Report: Restaurant & Beverage by Kanbay Research Institute


 

Fun Facts How many CDs have Cracker Barrel Old Country Store(r) retail shops sold? How much of the world's maple syrup do we use and sell? What is the best selling retail product? How many miles of thin stick candy do we sell every year? How many pounds of flour do we use every day to produce our biscuits and dumplins? How many oranges are in a 20 oz. glass of Cracker Barrel orange juice? How many did we serve last year--approximately? Bacon? 75 million slices 100 million slices 125 million slices Eggs? 125 million 150 million 175 million Orders of Chicken 'N" Dumplins? 6 million 12 million 18 million Where did Moon Pies originate? How much pancake mix did we sell in 2006? How many packets of preserves, jams and jellies do we use per year? Less than 50 million 50 to 75 million More than 75 million What percentage of our locations are on the interstate?


 

Answers Over 3 million CDs sold 6% of the world's maple syrup Rockers-Over $20 million in fiscal 2007 If laid end-to-end, the quantity of thin sticks would stretch 940 miles. We use 70,000 pounds of flour every day. 12 to 14 Valencia oranges are in each 20 oz. glass of orange juice 124 million slices of bacon; 150 million eggs, and 12 million orders of Chicken N' Dumplins Moon Pies were first made to fill miners' lunch pails in 1917. They are made by the Chattanooga Bakery in Chattanooga, TN. We sold enough pancake mix to make 8.7 million pancakes-a stack 34 miles high. B: 50 to 75 million packets of preserves, jellies and jams per year 87 percent of our locations are on the interstate


 

Our Vision To be the best restaurant company in America Our Mission Pleasing People


 

Our Familiar Brand Crosses the Nation with 565 Restaurants in 41 States = areas under development 31 5 1 3 22 27 29 19 27 11 9 6 4 17 4 9 26 16 21 4 12 10 4 8 4 2 6 2 2 1 33 49 56 40 36 4 1 1 1 1 1 As of October 3, 2007


 

We serve multi-generation families Travelers and neighbors alike(tm) Source: 2006 Awareness & Usage Study conducted by Marketing Workshop and 2006 Guest Loyalty Program conducted by Service Management Group. Our mix of age groups Our mix of travelers and neighbors Traveler Local 50-64 65+ Pct 0.4 0.6 0.36 0.22 Local 60% Travelers 40%


 

Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Breakfast Opportunities in all 3 day parts Lunch Dinner Avg. check increase FY 06 FY 07 $8.31 $8.17


 

Deep Industry Experience Retail Restaurant plus Food & beverage marketing Name Position Years at CBRL Years in Industry Mike Woodhouse Chairman, President & CEO 12 28 Doug Barber SVP, Restaurant Ops. 4 28 Doug Couvillion Bob Doyle Deb Evans Brian Eytchison Ed Greene SVP, Finance VP, Product Development VP, General Merchandise Manager/Product Development VP, Financial Planning & Analysis SVP, Strategic Initiatives 6 3 1 7 2 14 25 251 16 29 Rob Harig SVP, Human Resources 7 30 Terry Maxwell SVP, Retail Ops. 27 27 Forrest Shoaf SVP, General Counsel 2 12 Simon Turner SVP, CMO 2 142 Larry White SVP, Finance & CFO 8 20 Diana Wynne SVP, Corporate Affairs 2 28


 

5-Year Historical Perspective: Retail % to Total Sales


 

FY 06 Cracker Barrel Old Country Stores(r) Comparable Stores Outperform Knapp-Track(tm) Traffic FY 07 CBOCS Traffic Knapp- TrackTM Traffic


 

Consolidated Financial Highlights-- Continuing Operations $2,060 $2,191 $2,219 $2,352* $ in millions * Includes $46.3 million sales from 53rd week Includes $0.14 per share from 53rd week All Numbers exclude Logan's Roadhouse, Inc.


 

Consolidated Financial Highlights Continuing Operations Million shares $ in millions All Numbers exclude Logan's Roadhouse, Inc. * Includes $4.4 million from 53rd week


 

Return to Shareholders $ in millions Year-end share price


 

Free Cash Flow* Free Cash Flow is a non-GAAP financial measure derived from indicated GAAP components found on Statement of Cash Flows **Includes $27 million of cash paid for portion of redemption price of the Company's zero- coupon senior convertible notes that represented accreted interest Net cash provided by operating activities Cash used to purchase property and equipment Cash used for dividends


 

Operating Margin FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 East 0.099 0.097 0.103 0.096 0.106 West 30.6 38.6 34.6 31.6 North 45.9 46.9 45 43.9 Return on Invested Capital* Dividends Paid/Share Total Long-Term Debt Debt Maturity Schedule *See Reconciliation Table on Page 27


 

Quarterly Results-FY2007 31.76 25.06 30.18 36.02 36.01 Weighted average shares $2.52 $1.15 $0.44 $0.60 $0.45 Diluted EPS from continuing operations $76.0 $28.2 $12.1 $20.5 $15.2 Income from continuing operations 40.5 14.7 6.4 11.0 8.5 Provision for income taxes $116.5 $42.8 $18.5 $31.5 $23.7 Pretax income 51.7 14.7 11.6 10.8 14.6 Net Interest expense 7.2% 9.1% 5.5% 6.9% 6.9% Operating Margin $168.1 $57.6 $30.1 $42.2 $38.3 Operating income 136.2 33.4 31.5 34.0 37.3 General & administrative expense $304.3 $91.0 $61.6 $76.3 $75.5 Store operating income - - - - - Impairment & store closing costs 410.1 106.0 100.5 105.9 97.7 Other store operating expenses 892.8 242.1 219.0 219.6 212.2 Labor & other related expenses 744.3 193.1 167.9 210.4 172.9 Cost of goods sold $2,351.6 $632.1 $549.1 $612.1 $558.3 Total revenue 506.8 122.4 104.1 164.4 115.9 Retail $1,844.8 $509.8 $444.9 $447.8 $442.3 Restaurant FY2007* Q3 Q2 Q1 Q4* *Includes 53rd week which increased Total revenues by $46.3 million, Operating Income by $7.8 million, and Income from continuing operations by $4.4 million. $ in millions


 

Quarterly Results-FY2006 48.04 35.97 52.52 51.84 51.84 Weighted average shares $2.07 $0.82 $0.37 $0.53 $0.44 Diluted EPS $95.5 $28.4 $18.3 $26.7 $22.1 Income from continuing operations 44.9 10.1 9.3 13.8 11.7 Provision for income taxes $140.4 $38.5 $27.6 $40.5 $33.7 Pretax income 21.4 14.1 2.7 2.2 2.5 Net Interest expense 7.3% 9.3% 5.7% 7.3% 6.8% Operating Margin $161.8 $52.6 $30.3 $42.7 $36.2 Operating income 128.8 32.8 31.1 31.9 33.1 General & administrative expense $290.6 $85.3 $61.4 $74.6 $69.3 Store operating income 5.4 (1.5) 3.2 3.7 - Impairment & store closing costs 384.4 95.0 94.3 99.9 95.2 Other store operating expenses 832.9 210.9 209.4 208.2 204.4 Labor & other related expenses 706.1 173.5 165.8 200.2 166.6 Cost of goods sold $2,219.5 $563.3 $534.0 $586.7 $535.5 Total revenue 471.3 108.2 101.9 152.3 108.8 Retail $1,748.2 $455.1 $432.1 $434.4 $426.6 Restaurant FY2006 Q4 Q3 Q2 Q1 $ in millions


 

April 2006: Established $1.25 billion credit facility Acquired 16.75 million shares in Dutch Auction Tender Offer ($42.00 per share) December 2006: Divested Logan's Roadhouse ($485 million total consideration) Reduced debt by $75 million January 2007: Completed 2nd Dutch Auction Tender Offer acquiring 5.43 million shares ($46.00 per share) Third quarter 2007: Purchased 1.93 million shares for $91.4 million Fourth quarter 2007: Redeemed Senior Convertible Notes ($405 million principal amount at maturity) Purchased 1.4 million shares for $64 million Strategic Initiative


 

Store size: 10,000 sq. ft on approximately 2.5 acres of land Leased vs owned: 404 locations owned, 71.5% % on-interstate vs off: 12.5% off-interstate 55% off-interstate locations planned in FY08 Seats per restaurant: 200 Average number of employees per store: 105 Hourly turnover: 113% in FY07 Average unit volume: $3.34 million (53 week basis) Average weekly traffic: 7,600 Average check per guest: $8.31 Meal mix in FY07 Breakfast-23% Lunch-37% Dinner-40% Commodity breakdown expected in FY08 Beef 14% Vegetables 14 Dairy 13 Pork 11 Poultry 11 Seafood 7 65% of purchases contracted as of 9/12/07 Restaurant Data All numbers are for fiscal 2007


 

Size of retail 21.6% of sales 22% of square feet 3,400 SKUs $429/sq. ft. (53 week basis) Average unit volume: $.92 million (53 week basis) Leading products Rockers Weazle Balls Greeting cards Jumbo Checker/TicTacToe Rug Peg Games % of customers who purchase retail: 33% Second quarter highest retail sales due to Christmas holiday shopping Retail Data All numbers are for fiscal 2007


 

We see great long-term growth potential 1,200+ Units


 

All About Results-Fiscal 2008 (As of September 18, 2007 Press Release) Comparable store restaurant sales growth: 3 to 4% Comparable store retail sales growth: 3 to 5% 20 new stores; 4 opened as of October 3, 2007 Revenue growth of 4.5 to 5.5% Operating margin: 6.7 to 7.0% compared with 7.0% excluding the effect of the 53rd week in FY07 Depreciation and Interest Expense: $60 million Tax rate: 34.8% Diluted EPS: $3.05 to $3.20 Diluted weighted average shares: 23 to 23.5 million Capital expenditures: Approximately $105 million Maintenance capital <$30 million Simplify. Focus. Execute. Achieve Results!


 

10.6% 9.6% 10.3% 9.7% Return on invested capital= net operating income after tax /average invested capital 1,045 1,152 1,071 1,020 Average invested capital 860 1,214 1,082 1,058 977 Invested capital = equity + debt 756 912 212 185 187 Long-term debt $ 109.7 $ 110.1 $ 110.4 $ 98.7 Net Operating Profit Af ter Tax 104 302 870 873 789 Total shareholders' equity 7.2% 7.3% 7.7% 7.5% Operating margin = operating income/total sales $ 76.0 $ 95.5 $ 104.8 $ 93.3 Net Income 40.5 44.9 55.4 52.3 Provision for income taxes $ 116.5 $ 140.3 $ 160.2 $ 145.6 Income before income taxes 51.7 21.5 8.6 8.4 Net Interest $ 168.1 $ 161.8 $ 168.8 $ 154.0 Operating Income $ 2,351.6 $ 2,219.5 $ 2,190.9 $ 2,060.5 Total sales FY07 FY06 FY05 FY04 FY03 Continuing operations Reconciliation Table $ 1,923.5 $ 146.2 8.9 $ 138.5 46.9 $ 91.6 7.6% 34.8% 32.0% 34.6% 35.9% Tax Rate 33.9% $ 96.6 9.9% 976 $ in millions

 

Exhibit 99.3
October 3, 2007 Comin' Right Up(tm) Investor Conference Diana Wynne SVP, Corporate Affairs


 

Safe-Harbor Statement CBRL Group, Inc. ("the Company") urges caution in considering current trends and earnings guidance disclosed in this presentation. Except for specific historical information, matters discussed in this presentation are forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results and performance of the Company to differ materially from those expressed or implied in this discussion. All forward-looking information is provided pursuant to the safe harbor established under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. More detailed information on risks, uncertainties, and other factors is provided in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, press releases and other communications. Reconciliations of non-GAAP financial disclosures to comparable GAAP measures found in this presentation may be viewed on the Company's website at cbrlgroup.com. Assume all numbers presented are unaudited unless noted.


 

Agenda 7:15 a.m. Diana Wynne: Welcome/ Schedule for Day 7:20 a.m. Doug Couvillion/Brian Eytchison Training Kitchen/Model Retail Store 7:50 a.m. Model Retail Store/Training Kitchen Reconvene in auditorium 8:20 a.m. Mike Woodhouse: One Brand--Simplify, Focus & Execute 8:50 a.m. Doug Barber: It's All About the Guest Experience! 9:20 a.m. Break


 

Agenda 9:35 a.m. Terry Maxwell/Deb Evans: Brand Leverage Through Retail 10:05 a.m. Simon Turner: Marketing-Winning the Minds of Customers 10:35 a.m. Break 10:50 a.m. Ed Greene: Purchasing/Commodities Overview 11:10 a.m. Larry White: Financial Review and Outlook 11:40 a.m. Mike Woodhouse: Wrap-up and Q&A 12:15 p.m. Bob Doyle: Product Development Showcase (Lunch) 1:45 p.m. Bus departs for airport

 

EXHIBIT 99.4
One Brand - Simplify, Focus & Execute Mike Woodhouse Chairman, President & CEO


 

It's About the Brand: Differentiation Clearly Defined with a Unique Selling Proposition at its Heart


 

It's About the Brand


 

It's About The Brand


 

It's About the Brand: Validation Awards & Research Oprah Winfrey Cracker Barrel excels in "providing an experience, not just a meal, and for remaining consistent to a business strategy that appropriately blends restaurant and retail." - Kanbay Research Institute, 2007 Raving Fans Drew Carey Emeril Lagasse Tom Lehman Chad Pennington Tiki Barber Aretha Franklin Merle Haggard Bo Diddley


 

It's About the Brand: Relevance Record-setting Opening Sales in New Stores in Fiscal 2007 Off-Interstate Huntsville, AL Lubbock, TX Sherman, TX On-Interstate Florida City, FL Market Penetration in Current Markets


 

Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 August FY08 5/1/2006 6/1/2006 7/1/2006 8/1/2006 9/1/2006 10/1/2006 11/1/2006 12/1/2006 1/1/2007 2/7/2007 3/1/2007 4/1/2007 5/7/2007 6/1/2007 7/1/2007 Knapp-Track -0.002 0.008 -0.011 -0.036 -0.018 -0.015 -0.04 -0.023 -0.015 -0.044 -0.044 -0.05 -0.037 -0.018 -0.036 -0.036 -0.024 -0.0435 -0.041 -0.032 -0.02 -0.032 -0.016 -0.0195 CBOCS Traffic -0.042 -0.016 -0.033 -0.04 0.002 -0.007 -0.014 -0.011 0.011 -0.036 -0.047 -0.038 -0.027 0.026 0.007 -0.0046 -0.0177 0.0008 -0.025 -0.024 0.003 -0.024 -0.011 -0.003 North 45.9 46.9 45 43.9 FY 06 Relevance in a Difficult Environment FY 07 CBOCS Traffic Knapp-TrackTM Traffic 19 Restaurant Traffic Outperforms Knapp-Track(tm) Traffic


 

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2020 45 to 64 74 75 77 78 81 83.653 65 + 37.424 38.6 34.6 31.6 40.2 54.6 North 45.9 46.9 45 43.9 It's About the Brand: Guest Appeal Growth Projections for Over 45 Year Olds Demographics Favors our Customer Mix- A 28 Million Person increase by 2020 U.S. Census Bureau


 

It's About the Brand: Guest Appeal Multi-Generational Appeal


 

It's About the Brand: Guest Appeal Traveler Local 50-64 65+ Pct 0.4 0.6 0.36 0.22 Neighbors 60% Travelers 40% Our Mix of Travelers and Neighbors Source: 2006 Awareness & Usage Study conducted by Marketing Workshop and 2006 Guest Loyalty Program conducted by Service Management Group.


 

It's About the Brand Improve Operating Margin Improve Return on Invested Capital Premium Return from a Premium Brand


 

It's About the People Pleasing People is all about mutual respect. "The store employees interact with our guests... and the rest of us are the support group for them...if they're successful in providing our customers the proper experience, then we're successful as a by-product of their success." Dan Evins, Founder May 2000


 

It's About the People: Training and Retention Programs Management Training Inclusion and Diversity E-Training PAR System Rising Stars Outcomes Higher Skills Lower Turnover Satisfied Employees Consistent Guest Service Our Goal Improve the Guest Experience


 

It's About the People: Strong Executive Team Name Position Years at CBRL Years in Industry Mike Woodhouse Chairman, President & CEO 12 28 Doug Barber SVP, Restaurant Operations 4 28 Ed Greene SVP, Strategic Initiatives 2 29 Rob Harig SVP, Human Resources 7 30 Terry Maxwell SVP, Retail 27 27 Forrest Shoaf SVP, General Counsel 2 12 Simon Turner SVP, CMO 2 14* Larry White SVP, Finance & CFO 8 20 Diana Wynne SVP, Corporate Affairs 2 28 * Food & beverage marketing


 

Simplify, Focus & Execute Simplify Transform the Business Model Focus Disciplined Approach Execute Capitalize on Known Demand Grow Margins Improve New Unit Performance Effective Marketing


 

Simplify, Focus & Execute Stay True to Positioning-- Value and Uniqueness


 

Thank you. Mike Woodhouse Chairman, President & CEO

 

EXHIBIT 99.5
It's All About the Guest Experience! Doug Barber SVP Restaurant Operations


 

Improve the Base Business Model Objective: Grow Restaurant Traffic / Sales Improve Store Level Margins Improve: Guest Experience Store Level Margins Operations Innovation-Speed! New Store Performance


 

Improve the Guest Experience Rising Stars Guest Loyalty The Medallion: NO Guest Left Behind


 

Rising Stars History Par Program Par Zero 40,000 Cross Functional Team Cross Functional Team Cross Functional Team Cross Functional Team Cross Functional Team


 

Rising Stars Selection On-boarding/ Off-boarding Reviews on Time Advance Skill Level Advance Skill Level Advance Skill Level Advance Skill Level Advance Skill Level


 

Sept FY07 Oct FY07 Nov FY07 Dec FY07 Jan FY07 Feb FY07 Mar FY07 Apr FY07 May FY07 June FY07 July FY07 August FY08 Sept FY08 % Improvement in Number of Rising Star Terms vs. LY -0.0202 -0.0155 -0.034 0.1547 -0.0349 -0.1685 -0.1746 -0.1163 -0.376 -0.252 -0.1546 -0.3231 February FY07: Rising Star Initiative Rolls Out to Stores Reduction in Turnover Year-Over-Year


 

Why Rising Stars? The Most Significant Correlation to Growing Traffic/Sales and Profitability Employee Turnover Employee Skill Level Number of Employees Availability/Flexibility


 

The Medallion No Guest Left Behind Total Team Awareness to Every Guest's Experience Sensitivity to Early Warning Signs: Red Flags Pleasing People Recovery of Less than "5" Experience Sorry Thank You Action Recovery Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees Share Information with Managers and Employees


 

Guest Loyalty Program IVR Based Guest Feedback Program Feedback Against the Drivers of Loyalty Why "5's"? Why Speed? 6 Quarters/ 5 Quarters leading Knapp TrackTM


 

Guest Loyalty Program Improved Scores 4 months in a Row Overall Satisfaction Speed Intent to Return Intent to Recommend Value Improved Scores 5 months in a Row Intent to Return & Recommend


 

Operations Innovation-Speed! Brand Challenge: Incredible Brand Loyalty Experience Takes Too Long Wait Times and Service Times Speed!


 

Operations Innovation-Speed! "Best of the Barrel" Menu Labor Deployment Seat to Eat: 14 minutes Process Simplification


 

Operations Innovation-Speed! "Best of the Barrel" Menu Increase Speed Improve Margin Reduce Operational Complexity Maintain Brand Appeal & Architecture Grow Guest Loyalty Reduce Food Waste


 

Operations Innovation-Speed! Labor Deployment Project History of Current Labor Deployment System Vision of The Future Labor Deployment System Training Hours Allocation Fixed Hours Allocation Guest Experience Hours Allocation


 

Operations Innovation-Speed! Throughput Capacity Management (TCM) Labor Recipes Production & Service Delivery Analysis Cook Line Facility Layout & Equipment Analysis


 

Operations Innovation-Speed! Seat to EAT: 14 minutes Principal Service Areas: Seat-to-Order Order-to-Window Window-to-Table


 

Operations Innovation-Speed! Process Simplification Objective Create recipes and processes that can be consistently executed at all CBOCS stores and will deliver the target quality food to our guests.


 

Improve Store Level Margins Tight Focus On: The Details of Execution Carefully Managing Expenses * Declining Check Book Margin Opportunity Initiative Cross-Functional Teams


 

Improve New Store Performance New Store Performance: Keys to Success Site Selection Store Management Teams Site Selection Process Pre-Opening Preparation Meetings Simplified New Store Menu Post-Opening 45-day Meeting


 

Improve the Base Business Model Objective: Grow Restaurant Traffic / Sales Improve Store Level Margins Improve: Guest Experience Store Level Margins Operations Innovation-Speed! New Store Performance


 

Improve the Base Business Model Simplify Focus Execute Discipline


 

Q&A Doug Barber SVP Restaurant Operations

 

Exhibit 99.6
October 3, 2007 Brand Leverage through Retail Terry Maxwell SVP, Retail


 

Talking Points How Retail Leverages the Brand Retail Business Objectives Key Strategies: Product, Pricing, Presentation, Packaging Key Tactics: Conversion, AUR, UPTs,


 

Shared Themes at the Table and in the Store Recap Execute Concept Plan Marketing Retail Restaurant BRAND PROMISE "Cracker Barrel provides a friendly home-away-from-home in our old country store and restaurant. Our guests are cared for like family while relaxing and enjoying real home-style food and shopping that's surprisingly unique, genuinely fun and reminiscent of America's country heritage... all at a fair price."


 

A Very Strong Brand The Brand Purpose of Retail A Unique Restaurant Brand in Consumers' Minds "Half Restaurant. Half Store. All Country(r)" Not a Major Destination in Itself The Image of Retail An American Old Country Store Feeling of Authenticity, Country, Nostalgia, Family A Seasonal Fun Atmosphere that Flows into the Restaurant Menu MUST Support the Brand Name and Unique Selling Proposition


 

Why Do People Buy? Impulse No Plan to Purchase but Saw Something They Wanted One-Stop Shopping Plan to Eat and also Purchase Retail Gift and/or Card


 

Retail at Cracker Barrel Total Retail Sales FY 07 $507 Million Average Store Volume $917,000 Sales Per Square Foot $429 Margin Improvements 250 Basis Pts Since FY 04 Percent To Total FY 07 21.6% Percent To Total FY 04 23.6%


 

Retail Business Model Financial Objectives Grow Retail Sales Improve Profitability Grow Retail Percent-to-Total Strategies Product Pricing Presentation Packaging


 

Product Strategy Develop programs and items that are surprisingly unique, genuinely fun and reminiscent of America's country heritage ...all at a fair price.


 

Product Strategy Holiday Seasonal Everyday/Basics 4th Qtr East 55 25 20 20.4 West 30.6 38.6 34.6 31.6 North 45.9 46.9 45 43.9 Holiday (Christmas, Halloween) Seasonal (Garden, Harvest) Everyday "Basics" (Replenishable)


 

Pricing Strategy "We are fair, genuine, real folks who believe in giving honest value for money." Comprehensive Item Price Review Assortment Mix Changes Right Sizing Buys


 

Pricing Strategy We will put primary focus on utilizing an "offensive" pricing strategy to drive multiple unit sales and improve primary metrics in our business model: UPT, Conversion, GM Dollars and improve primary metrics in our business model: UPT, Conversion, GM Dollars and improve primary metrics in our business model: UPT, Conversion, GM Dollars Clearance Multiple Unit Sales Full Price Lower MARGIN Higher


 

Presentation Strategy "Thrill of the Hunt" Visual Merchandising Explore Discover Connect Purchase


 

Packaging Strategy Develop Packaging that..... Supports and Leverages the Personality of the Brand Adds Value to the Product and Shopping Experience


 

Retail Business Model Financial Objectives Grow Retail Sales Improve Profitability Grow Retail Percent-to-Total Tactics Increase Number of People Who Buy (Conversion) Improve Price Points (Avg. Unit Retail) Grow Number of Units Each Customer Buys (UPTs)


 

Guest Conversion Guest Conversion Will Contribute to Same Store Sales Increase In 2008 Target Programs In-Stock Positions Service Sells Presentation Strategies


 

Average Unit Retail (AUR) Average Unit Retails Will Support Retail Sales Growth Initiatives In 2008 Everyday Basics Comprehensive Item Price Review Assortment Mix Seasonal & Holiday Continued Focus on Right Sizing Buys to Increase Pre-clearance Sell-through % with Improved Margin Utilize the Clearance Corner for Fall FY08 to Facilitate In-season Clearance and Reduce Clearance Signage in Prime Floor Space Locations


 

Units Per Transaction (UPTs) Units Per Transaction will grow to support same store sales increase for 2008 Point-of-sale Improved BOGO Capabilities Added Functionality to Encourage Multiple Unit Sales Bundled Purchases Reduced Markdowns In-stock Positions Replenishment Systems Enhancements Integrated "Exception Management" Capability


 

Summary How Retail Leverages the Brand Retail Business Objectives Key Strategies: Product, Pricing, Presentation, Packaging Key Tactics: Conversion, AUR, UPTs,

 

Exhibit 99.7
October 3, 2007 Deb Evans VP / GMM Product Development


 

The Power of One One authentic Cracker Barrel Brand Restaurant & Retail


 

Brand Leverage through Retail How will retail leverage the brand? Merchandise Planning - Create with the end in mind New Packaging Concept Maximize the Cracker Barrel Brand Potential Focused Concept Theme Development Integrated Cross Merchandising & Presentation FLO - Floor set Location Optimization Holistic Store Experience


 

Merchandise Planning Create with the end in mind Buying and product development process driven with focus Visual Drivers Volume Drivers Unit Drivers


 

Brand Leverage Through Retail How will retail leverage the brand? Merchandise Planning - Create with the end in mind New Packaging Concept Maximize the Private Brand Potential Focused Concept Theme Development Integrated Cross Merchandising & Presentation FLO - Floor set Location Optimization Holistic Store Experience


 

Packaging Strategy Drive Sales growth by developing packaging that supports and leverages the personality of the brand, adding value to the product and shopping experience. Leverage the emotional connection. Embrace brand authenticity. Support "look and feel" seasonal direction. Communicate story telling and/or features and benefits. Create operational packaging improvements.


 

Retail Packaging Impact Increased Brand Loyalty Increased likelihood of purchase, conversions. Creates more browsing, more buyers. Provide cues of a revitalized energy leading to more engagement and purchase intent. Portray a genuine sense of quality, better value, higher AUR.


 

Brand Impact with Iconic Visuals Brand Impact with Iconic Visuals


 

Visual Validation Visual Validation


 

Creating the Emotional Connection Creating the Emotional Connection


 

Current Retail Food Packaging Current Retail Food Packaging


 

Current Pancake Mix and Apple Butter Packaging Packaging Packaging


 

Proposed New Pancake Mix and Apple Butter Packaging Butter Packaging Butter Packaging


 

Creating the Emotional Connection Creating the Emotional Connection


 

Creating Iconic Gift Wrap Creating Iconic Gift Wrap


 

Brand Leverage Through Retail How will retail leverage the brand? Merchandise Planning - Create with the end in mind New Packaging Concept Maximize the Private Brand Potential Focused Concept Theme Development Integrated Cross Merchandising & Presentation FLO - Floor set Location Optimization Holistic Store Experience


 

Chocolate Chocolate Chocolate


 

American Heritage American Heritage American Heritage


 

Family Road Trip


 

Family Road Trip Family Road Trip


 

State Fair


 

State Fair


 

Inspirational Baby Inspirational Baby


 

Cracker Barrel Kids Cracker Barrel Kids


 

Family Reunion Insert Family Reunion art art art


 

Apple Apple Apple


 

Brand Leverage Through Retail How will retail leverage the brand? Merchandise Planning - Create with the end in mind New Packaging Concept Maximize the Private Brand Potential Focused Concept Theme Development Integrated Cross Merchandising & Presentation FLO - Floor set Location Optimization Holistic Store Experience


 

Integrated Cross Merchandising & Presentation Create cross merchandise product Presentations (i.e. apparel, gifts, accessories and food) Maximize clear and easy shopping experience Signal energy & newness to the customer


 

Brand Leverage Through Retail How will retail leverage the brand? Merchandise Planning - Create with the end in mind New Packaging Concept Maximize the Private Brand Potential Focused Concept Theme Development Integrated Cross Merchandising & Presentation FLO - Floor set Location Optimization Holistic Store Experience


 

Brand Leverage Through Retail How will retail leverage the brand? Merchandise Planning - Create with the end in mind New Packaging Concept Maximize the Private Brand Potential Focused Concept Theme Development Integrated Cross Merchandising & Presentation FLO - Floor set Location Optimization Holistic Store Experience


 

The Power of Brand Brands with Energy are brands that thrive. Brands that are authentic are brands that thrive. Brands that are unique and offer value are brands that thrive.


 

Q&A Brand Leverage Through Retail Terry Maxwell & Deb Evans

 

EXHIBIT 99.8
Marketing: Winning the Minds of Customers Simon Turner Chief Marketing Officer


 

A Very Strong Brand


 

What Creates Our "Atmosphere"? "Country Place" - a Porch with Rockers and a Dining Area with a Fireplace, Wood Tables and Chairs, Table Lamps and Country Food


 

What Creates Our "Atmosphere"? "Southern Hospitality" - Friendly Staff to Welcome and Serve You as a Good Friend in Both the Restaurant and the Gift Shop


 

What Creates Our "Atmosphere"? "Nostalgic" Decor and Merchandise


 

The Menu "Country" -- and somewhat "Southern", "Homestyle", "High Quality" and "Unique" The Names (Uncle Herschel) Specific Foods (Pork Chops, Grits) Preparation (Fried/Breaded) Flavors (Smoked) Portion Sizes


 

High Quality Food "Homemade" "Homestyle" Actual taste of the food Healthy Food- Availability of Vegetables The Menu


 

Brand Architecture


 

Brand Promise Cracker Barrel provides a friendly home-away-from-home in our old country store and restaurant. Our guests are cared for like family while relaxing and enjoying real home-style food and shopping that's surprisingly unique, genuinely fun and reminiscent of America's country heritage ...all at a fair price. Brand Architecture


 

Of Customers Of Customers Of Customers 26 23 51 Medium Users (17% of Visits) Distribution of Cracker Barrel Guests Heavy Users (76% of Visits) Light Users (7% of Visits) 26% of Guests 23% of Guests 51% of Guests


 

Market Research Highlights Opportunities Guest Average Age: 51 One of Largest Demographic Groups, Baby Boomers, is the Center of our Customer Base Conclusion: Embrace Current Guests But Attract Young Families Strongly Associated with Travel Unaided Awareness while Traveling: 24% About 60% of Guests are Local 74% of Local Dining Decisions Made Before Leaving Home Unaided Awareness for That Decision: 9% Conclusion: Raise Brand Awareness in Local Area


 

Effective Advertising Traffic Building Programs


 

Billboards That Will Be Seen Historically: 50%+ of Marketing $ for Billboards 1,500 Boards Nationally Second Largest Restaurant Outdoor Advertiser Brown-on-Gold Colors & Variations of Logo Used for 37 Years


 

A New Visual Experience!


 

Winner of the 2007 Stevie Award at the American Business Awards for Best Outdoor Campaign Award-Winning Billboards


 

FY2008 Billboard Plan Maintain the "Stevie" Winning Best Outdoor Advertising Campaign through FY2008 Research/Test Improved/Alternative Campaign Ideas Begin Vinyl Renewal May 2008 Test Multiple Local, Small Non-permanent Billboards around New and Off-interstate Stores


 

FY08 Advertising Raise LOCAL Awareness and Test TV for Media Efficiency beginning October 1 Greenville, SC Indianapolis, IN Jacksonville, FL Lexington, KY Louisville, KY Nashville, TN Communicating the Brand Promise


 

Advertising: TV Spots


 

FY08 Advertising Test Combined Radio and TV Effectiveness Work as Frequency Builder Communicate our Seasonal Promotion Items Communicating the Brand Promise


 

Advertising: Radio Spots


 

Seasonal Menu Promotion Provide Consistent Brand Imagery Throughout the Restaurant and Retail Environment Five Seasonal Windows Fall Holiday Winter Spring Summer Menu Items Chosen for Seasonal Fit, Appeal and Margin


 

Gift Cards Increased sales 24% to $63 million in FY 07 3rd Party Business Expansion Launched Fall 2006 11,300 Retailers in FY07 Plan to Double Number of Retailers by Year-End FY08 Additional Retailers include Kroger, Rite Aid, Sam's Club Launching 3rd Party Cards in Wal-Mart in FY08 640 Locations for the Holidays 2,100 by Fiscal Year-End


 

Objectives: Build Profitable Retail Sales Attract New Guests through the Artist's Association and Availability of Exclusive CD Generate Positive PR Strengthen the Brand's Country Image Results: More Than 3 million CDs Sold Extensive PR + Awareness Songs of the Year Televised Concert on GAC + National Radio Broadcast + Major Media PR Innovative Country Music Program 36% of Guests are Avid Country Music Fans


 

Award Winning Billboards TV and Radio Tests Seasonal Menu Expanding Gift Card Program Building Music Awareness and Relevance Program Traffic Building Programs Increased Awareness and Relevance of a Great Brand Drive Increased Traffic and Sales


 

Q&A Simon Turner Chief Marketing Officer

 

Exhibit 99.9

Strategic Initiatives Purchasing / Commodities Overview Ed Greene


 

Purchasing Overview MISSION To Ensure that our Restaurants are Continuously Supplied with the Specified Products and Services at the Best Possible Cost


 

Restaurant Supply Chain 150 Suppliers 6 Distribution Centers Raw Materials Processing Margins Freight Distribution Fee 565 Locations


 

Approach Develop and Implement Purchasing Strategies Which Suppliers, How Many, Why? What Length of Term, Why? What Pricing Structure, Why? What Other Provisions, Why? Manage Supplier Performance Leverage Supplier Relationships Manage Commodity Price Risk


 

Leverage Supplier Relationships New Product Development Value Engineering Market Research and Consumer Insights Diversity and Inclusion Sustainability Initiatives


 

Commodity Price Risk Management OBJECTIVE Buy Against Price Expectations to Capture Margin Improvement Opportunities and Mitigate Risk APPROACH Establish Pricing Formulas by Product Competitively Bid and Negotiate Formulas Take Commodity Positions Through Suppliers Based on Risk/Reward Analysis


 

Chicken Tenderloin Market Pricing $ Per Pound Jan Feb Mar Apr May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec 2004 2.02 2.35 2.69 2.78 2.79 2.8 2.81 2.61 2.31 1.82 1.7 1.7 2005 1.71 1.87 1.98 2.09 1.94 1.81 1.8 1.8 1.88 1.65 1.51 1.51 2006 1.46 1.46 1.48 1.48 1.55 1.67 1.85 2.06 2.01 1.63 1.58 1.78 2007 2.04 2.34 2.46 2.59 2.47 2.18 2.17 2.23 2.31


 

FY08 Expected Food Purchases Beef Pork Poultry Dairy (Incl. Eggs) Fruits & Vegetables Seafood Grains Oils Other Sugars & Sweeteners Beverages East 0.14 0.11 0.11 0.13 0.14 0.07 0.07 0.04 0.05 0.08 0.05 West 30.6 38.6 34.6 31.6 North 45.9 46.9 45 43.9


 

FY08 Locked Pricing as of 9/12/07 Locked Unlocked 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr East 0.65 0.35 90 20.4 West 30.6 38.6 34.6 31.6 North 45.9 46.9 45 43.9


 

Purchasing Overview MISSION To Ensure that our Restaurants are Continuously Supplied with the Specified Products and Services at the Best Possible Cost


 

Commodity Situation Agriculture and Energy Resources and Markets are Converging - Ethanol, Bio-diesel, Crop-Based Plastics/ Industrial Goods Global Demand Increasing for Food and Energy Driven by Strong Economic Growth in Developing Countries U.S. Food Industry is Built on Corn - Primary Cost Driver for Beef, Pork, Dairy, Poultry, Eggs, Sweeteners High Corn Prices have Ripple Effect on Price and Supply of Other Crops - Soybeans, Wheat, Vegetables Compete for Acreage Worldwide Commodity Stocks to Use Ratios are Low and in Decline Leading to Increased Price Volatility and Risk


 

Corn World Market


 

Corn Futures - Long Term Nearby Futures Contract 5-Yr Moving Avg. 10-Yr Moving Avg. Cents Per Bushel Year

 

EXHIBIT 99.10
Financial Review and Outlook Larry White CFO


 

Strategic Initiatives Review


 

Strategic Initiatives--Rationale Initiated strategic review fall 2005 - intended to improve company performance and enhance shareholder value CBRL stock trading at discount to peers Favorable debt and equity capital markets CBRL stock valuation not receiving benefit of growth concept (Logan's) Strong brand, solid balance sheet and significant stable cash flow - financial strength and stability Opportunities identified: Increase shareholder value through increased financial leverage and monetization of Logan's Single-brand focus on long-term Cracker Barrel opportunities


 

Strategic Initiatives--Components $1.175 Billion Senior Secured Credit Facility in May 2006 $250 million Revolver $725 million Term Loan to fund share repurchases $200 million delayed-draw Term Loan to refinance existing convertible debt


 

Strategic Initiatives--Components $1.175 Billion Senior Secured Credit Facility Dutch Auction Tender Offer to Repurchase Shares Repurchased 16.75 million shares at $42 per share on 5/4/06 Drew approximately $725 million under credit facility for repurchase and related fees and expenses


 

Strategic Initiatives--Components $1.175 Billion Senior Secured Credit Facility Dutch Auction Tender Offer to Repurchase Shares Divestiture of Logan's Roadhouse, Inc. Sold to private equity investors for total consideration of approximately $485 million


 

Strategic Initiatives--Components $1.175 Billion Senior Secured Credit Facility Dutch Auction Tender Offer to Repurchase Shares Divestiture of Logan's Roadhouse, Inc. Repurchase Shares and Reduce Debt With Proceeds Reduced Term Loan by $75 million immediately from proceeds and excess cash Completed a $250 million Dutch Auction tender offer ( 5.4 million shares at $46 on 1/18/07) Completed $100 million of open market repurchases (2.1 million shares in May 2007)


 

Strategic Initiatives--Components $1.175 Billion Senior Secured Credit Facility Dutch Auction Tender Offer to Repurchase Shares Divestiture Logan's Roadhouse, Inc. Repurchase Shares and Reduce Debt With Proceeds Completed exchange offer for 89% of LYONs maturity value, redeeming 100% of convertible debt (remaining LYONs plus exchanged notes) on 6/4/07


 

Strategic Initiatives--Components $1.175 Billion Senior Secured Credit Facility Dutch Auction Tender Offer to Repurchase Shares Divestiture of Logan's Roadhouse, Inc. Repurchase Shares and Reduce Debt With Proceeds Completed Exchange Offer for 89% of LYONs Maturity Value, Redeeming 100% of Convertible Debt Repurchase Shares Issued On Conversion of Convertible Debt (0.4 million shares in fourth quarter FY 07)


 

PRO-FORMA PRO-FORMA PRO-FORMA Strategic Initiatives Impact Strategic Initiatives Impact Strategic Initiatives Impact Diluted EPS Effect Diluted EPS Effect Diluted EPS Effect % Inc/(Dec) % Inc/(Dec) % Inc/(Dec) Operating Income (15%) (a) Interest Expense (30%) (b) Pre-Tax Income (45%) (c) Average Diluted Shares Outstanding 68% (d) Diluted EPS 23% (e) (a) Based on FY06 - last full year of Logan's operations (b) Based on post-restructuring $60 million interest expense projection vs. $6 million pre-restructuring convertible debt interest expense (c) Based on FY06 operating income less Logan's operations and $60 million projected post-restructuring interest expense (d) Based on Q3 FY06 YTD (pre-restructuring) vs. FY 08 projection of 23.5 million (e) Based on decrease in pre-tax income from disposition and higher interest (c) and a 55% decrease in average diluted shares outstanding (at a constant tax rate) Strategic Initiatives - Impact


 

Historical Financial Review


 

Annual Store Growth 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Units 257 307 357 396 426 437 457 480 504 529 543 562 Annual % Growth 0.2 0.19 0.16 0.11 0.08 0.04 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.05 0.04 0.035 Total Stores Annual % Growth


 

Restaurant and Retail Comparable Store Sales FY03 FY04 FY05 FY06 FY07 Restaurant 0.005 0.02 0.031 -0.011 0.007 Retail -0.004 0.053 -0.027 -0.081 0.032


 

Revenue Growth (Continuing Operations) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Total Revenu 1924 2060 2191 2219 2352 Annual Growth 0.051 0.071 0.063 0.013 0.06 Annual % Growth Total Revenue


 

Operating Income and Margins (Continuing Operations) 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Operating Income 147.006 153.972 168.821 161.796 168.145 % margin 0.076 0.075 0.077 0.073 0.072 % Margin Operating Income *FY 06 and FY 07 include stock option expense (SFAS123R) of $8.5 and $6.3 million, respectively, or 0.4% and 0.3% of revenue, respectively.


 

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 East 1.73 1.78 2.05 2.07 2.52 West 31.6 North 43.9 Diluted Earnings Per Share Growth (Continuing Operations)


 

Free Cash Flow* (Continuing Operations) Net cash provided by operating activities Cash Used to Purchase Property and Equipment Cash used for dividends 2003 200.251 2004 162.449 2005 230.361 2006 174.694 2007 96.872 * Non-GAAP financial measure derived from indicated GAAP components found on Statement of Cash Flows Net cash provided by operating activities FY 07 included $96 million cash used for taxes on Logan's disposition & taxes/expenses for LYONs redemption 10.4% 7.9% 10.5% 7.9% 4.1% % of Revenue


 

Free Cash Flow* (Continuing Operations) Net cash provided by operating activities Cash Used to Purchase Property and Equipment Cash used for dividends 2003 200.251 90.647 2004 162.449 108.216 2005 230.361 124.624 2006 174.694 89.715 2007 96.872 96.538 * Non-GAAP financial measure derived from indicated GAAP components found on Statement of Cash Flows Cash used to purchase property and equipment 69% 68% 72% 70% 72% New Store % of Total


 

Free Cash Flow* (Continuing Operations) Net cash provided by operating activities Cash Used to Purchase Property and Equipment Cash used for dividends 2003 200.251 90.647 1.043 2004 162.449 108.216 16.191 2005 230.361 124.624 22.764 2006 174.694 89.715 24.019 2007 96.872 96.538 15.61 Cash used for dividends * Non-GAAP financial measure derived from indicated GAAP components found on Statement of Cash Flows $0.02 $0.33 $0.47 $0.51 $0.55 Dividends Paid per Share of Common Stock


 

8/3/07 7/28/06 Net Non-Cash Working Capital Deficit (a) ($89) ($94) Property & Equipment - net 1,019 983 Memo: CBOCS Owned Locations 402 390 CBOCS Leased Locations 160 153 Total Assets $1,265 $1,681 % of Tot. Cap % of Tot. Cap Balance Sheet Long-Term Debt $756 88% $911 75% Total Equity 104 12% 302 25% Total Capitalization $860 100% $1,213 100% (a) (Current Assets - Cash - Current Assets of Discontinued Operations) - (Current Liabilities - Current Liabilities of Discontinued Operations) Balance Sheet Highlights ($ millions except store counts and percentages)


 

FY 2008 Outlook (September 18, 2007 Press Release)


 

Safe-Harbor Statement CBRL Group, Inc. ("the Company") urges caution in considering current trends and earnings guidance disclosed in this presentation. Except for specific historical information, matters discussed in this presentation are forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results and performance of the Company to differ materially from those expressed or implied in this discussion. All forward-looking information is provided pursuant to the safe harbor established under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. More detailed information on risks, uncertainties, and other factors is provided in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, press releases and other communications. Reconciliations of non-GAAP financial disclosures to comparable GAAP measures found in this presentation may be viewed on the Company's website at cbrlgroup.com. Assume all numbers presented are unaudited unless noted.


 

Full-Year FY 08 Guidance Total Revenue* +4.5 - 5.5% Store Openings 20 Comparable Restaurant Sales +3.0 - 4.0% Comparable Retail Sales +3.0 - 5.0% Operating Margins 6.7 - 7.0% Diluted EPS** $3.05 - $3.20 *Revenue growth above FY 2007 including 53rd week **Assumes FY 07 tax rate pending evaluation of adoption of FIN 48 FY 2008 Outlook (September 18, 2007 Press Release)


 

Long-Term Diluted EPS Growth Objectives


 

Components Annual Diluted EPS Growth Impact Average Unit Volume Growth 2-3% New Store Expansion 4-5% Total Revenue Growth 6-8% Operating Margin Expansion 2-4% Operating Income Growth 8-12% Financial Leverage Effect 4-5% Annual Diluted EPS Growth 12-17% Long-Term Annual Diluted EPS Growth Objectives

 

Exhibit 99.11
VP, Product Dev. & Quality Assurance Product Development & Process Simplification Bob Doyle


 

Process Simplification Objective: Create recipes and processes that can be consistently executed at all CBOCS stores and will deliver the target quality food to our guests


 

Process Simplification Process Review each product for opportunities to transfer production steps to our suppliers Identify the most efficient equipment for the new processes Validate quality of new products, recipes or process through standard testing protocol


 

New Product Development-Supplier Capabilities Objective: Create an array of new products by tapping into the culinary talents and technical resources of several larger suppliers